Tuesday, December 22, 2015

The First Chore of Spring


I know winter has barely started but I've got a lucky break with the weather and a chance to revitalize my brown, bald spotted, drought parched lawn.

In the last couple of years, I've overseeded with drought resistant grass seed. That worked fairly well and gave me a lush, green lawn for about 4 months but wilted under our 100+ degree summer heat fairly rapidly with our states water rationing scheme.


This year, I'll add to that a bag of heat resistant seed just to see what happens.


It rained pretty good on Friday so I had a damp lawn, with soft soil, to aerate on Saturday. I then overseeded with the spreader.

We're expecting two days of rain on Sunday so that will give me two days of watering in and I don't have to worry about running afoul of the water cops.

It should be a wet winter here, so I'm hoping that it'll take a minimum of spinkler use to get it germinated and established. Then we'll see just how 'heat-resistant' this grass really is.

Darryl
Copyright 2015 - Darryl Musick
All Rights Reserved

Thursday, December 17, 2015

The Weeds of Winter


Still not a lot to do in the garden these days but the weeds don't take the season off. 


A trowel helps me dig these out of the dirt.


In the rose garden, out front, this Chinese elm seedling has camoflauged itself within the roses. 


At this size, the root is very deep and it is impossible to hand-pull out of the ground, so I dig as deep as I can with my trowel.


This is as much as of the root as I was able to get. I hope it's enough because these weeds are very hard to get rid of completely once they take hold.

Darryl
Copyright 2015 - Darryl Musick
All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Winter's Tangy Harvest


Late fall...winter starts next week...and in the middle of a big drought, not a lot to do in the garden but we can find something.

December in Southern California is citrus season and our three trees are producing! 

The cara cara navel orange tree (at the top of this post) has put out the most fruit it's ever given us.


Our Meyer lemon is not far behind.


We harvest just enough to last us for a week or so and let the rest of the fruit stay on the tree til we're ready for more.


Along with the oranges and lemons, I also find a few rogue Anaheim chiles that will go into tomorrow's eggs.


These tart but sweet cara caras are just the ticket for a nice, healthy shot of vitamin C on the side of this sandwich.

Darryl
Copyright 2015 - Darryl Musick
All Rights Reserved